There is no better feeling than sitting down with a good book. Poetry is a great way to enjoy reading and take time out for yourself. Especially if you don’t find yourself having the time to sit and read a novel. Poetry can also help you appreciate the value of the words and the theme of the poem itself. In this blog we will share with you three poetry books that are the perfect read for National Poetry Day.

A Poem For Every Day Of The Year

A Poem For Every Day of the Year is a magnificent collection of 366 poems compiled by Allie Esiri, one to share on every day of the year. Reflecting the changing seasons and linking to events on key dates – funny for April Fool’s Day, festive for Christmas – these poems are thoughtful, inspiring, humbling, informative, quiet, loud, small, epic, peaceful, energetic, upbeat, motivating, and empowering!

A Poem For Every Feeling

Set Me On Fire is an anthology for a new moment in poetry: a collection of fresh, vibrant voices from poets all over the globe, both living and dead. With an intuitive, accessible, feelings-first format, these are poems for the moments when you really need to know that someone else has been there too.

These are poems about eating and kissing and having too many feelings, about being outside and inside and loving someone so much you think you might die. They are about break-ups and getting back together and oh-god-it’s-complicated-don’t-ask-me moments. They are about wanting and waiting and having, about grieving and life after death and the end of the world.

They are, in other words, about being alive.

Poetry Rebellion

As with all life on Earth, the climate emergency, species extinction, ecological disaster, global pandemics, economic collapse, war, genocide and social injustice are all interconnected ― how do we face our fears? How do we find the courage to rebel against forces ranged against the Earth?

This galvanising collection of poems spans 4,000 years of human history. Ranging from Nikolai Duffy’s ‘Against Metaphor’ and Lord Byron’s ‘Darkness’ to Allen Ginsberg’s evocative ‘Sunflower Sutra’ and Jean ‘Binta’ Breeze’s ‘Tweet Tweet’. This book is not just a sanctuary in which to find solace from environmental grief but a manual for psychic resistance in the war against Nature. 

As Pablo Neruda said, ‘Poetry is rebellion.’